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Mountain Messenger
Lewisburg, West Virginia
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November 8, 1990     Mountain Messenger
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November 8, 1990
 

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8A The Mountain Messenger, Thursday, November 8, 1990 Helen Woodward Black cohosh, cimtclfuga lac(,nlOSCl of the ranunculaceae or crowfoot family, is a native AlnerlcaJl perennial plmll. Many herbalists conskter this plant to be nature's chiropractor as black cohosh is an herb of regulation. Sometimes called black sn~eroot, or squawroot, black cohosh can be found In uplmld woodland areas and along hill- sides of higher elevations. The leaves are irregular while the long flower stein, from three to nine feet tn length, is smooth arid furrowed. Small while blooms appear in clusters along tile stein from may to August. The rootstock, used nledlcinally, is large and knotty with very few short roots. In Latin, cim~tfl~ga means "to drive away," The black cohosh plant Itself does serve as a repel- lent to many bugs and insects while extracts from the root will "drive away", pains and stress from within the body. American Indian women used the plant for rheumatism, as well as to relieve pains during childbirth and tile menstrual cycle. In 1831, Dr Young introduced the plant into tile medical world as a cardiac tonic, a treatment lbr bronchitis, rheumatism, neuralgia and vari- ous fever-related aihnents. Sev- eral physR'ians lavored the planl in treating whooping cotlgh as this herb has the ability to ctlHse phlegm to be coughe~Ftq~ from the hmgs. Preparing black t'ohosh for use begins in the fall by (li~ing the roots, cleaning Ihcnl aild al lowing them to (IIT, They are ei ther chopped tip it) be used as a lea, powdered and prepare(1 as capsules, or preserved in alcohtfl to be laken as a tincture. Three daily doses are re(-ommcrided until tile problems sul:)side More is never better, especially in re gard to black cohosh as large doses will cause vertigo, tremors, and vomiting. Editor's Note: These articles are intended for educatior'al pur- poses only. They are not intended to treat, diagnose or prescribe, nor to be considered as a substb tute for professional care. Highways Department Places Bridge Weight Limits The West Virginia Division of Highways has placed new re- strictlons on bridges in Green- brier, Harrison and Mineral counties and closed a Ritchie County span. Trucks and buses are limited to crossing one at a time on the Greenbrter County 27/1 bridge over the westbound lanes of 1-64 north of County 27 West of Smoot. A seven-mile alternate route is available via County 28, 60/32, 25 and 27. "ltie Harrison County 4 cross- ing of Big Elk Creek south of County 4/12 at Wallace now carries silhouette postlngs for various types of trucks, in addi- tion to requiring trucks and buses to cross one at a time. Two-a,~e trucks are limited to 16 tons, trucks of three or more ax- les to 21 tons, semi-trailers of three or four ,axles to 25 tons and semi-trailers of five or more axles to 31.5 tons. Overweight vehicles can foUow a seven mile detour via County 6, 20/5 and 20/6 and WV 20. Now posted lor eight tons Iol lowing repair work, the Mineral County 13 bridge over Palterson Creek south of County 11 near Russelldale had previously been restricted to six tons, with ve- hicles crossing one at a time. An 11-mile detour is available lbr overweight vehicles via County 220/7, US 220 and 50 and County 11. Formerly posted for three tons, the Ritchie County IO crossing of Sugar Run west of County 50/40 near "lbll Gate is now closed to all vehicular and pedestrian Irafftc. A six-mile de- tour follows Counly 50/40, ~VV 74 and US 50. DON'T BE A NEW CAR LOSERI If you buy a new car or truck you will lose 50 percen! of the value in only two years. Check out our nice car & truck selection. 1988 PLYMOU'T~fl VOYAGER GRAND LE- long body, loaded .................. $12,995 1957 HISSAN PATHF/NDER XE-V6, loaded, 4X4 ......................................... $12,995 1984 FORD F-150 ~X4-4 s~xi., sharp ................................................................ $6495 1987 HISSM~-5 s~., air, cassette, like new ..................................... ~. ............... $5995 1982 GMC VANDURA VAN-loaded ................................................................. $3995 t984 S-10-V6, 4 spd., 4 wheel drive, Durango Pkg .......................................... $4995 1983 RANGER-4 wheel drive, 4 cyl, 4 spd., camper top .................................. $4295 1977 FORD F*t 50-4 wheel drive, 6 cyl. 4 spd., PS .......................................... $3995 1984 RANGER-V6, auto, PS, PB ...................................................................... $3495 1~1 FORD F-100-4 spd., nice truck .............................................................. $2795 1984 BRONCO II-auto., PS, PB. takpe deck .................................................... $5495 1978 FORD 4X4-auto, air, must see .................................................................. $4995 1954 BLAZER S-10-Tahoe Package, loaded .................................................... $6995 1~ FORD F-150 LWB-4 spd., one owner, like new ........................................ $7995 1983 Z-28-auto, air, tape deck, sharp ................................................................ $4995 t988 C~G.V6, auto, tape, 16.000 miles .................................................... $7995 1~ HONDA CIVIC HATCHBACK-4 spd., air ................................................. $6795 1988 CORSICA.auto, air, one owner ................................................................. $6995 19119 SUBARg-auto, air, 26.000 miles .............................................................. $7995 1951 LYNX SW-auto, air, front wheel drive ....................................................... $1995 1988 ARIES SW-Ioaded. like new ..................................................................... $6995 1 ~ORD GALAXIE-VS, auto, radio ............................................................... $1495 1981 BUICK CENTURY-V8, auto, air, cas~tle ................................................ $2495 LARGE ENOUGH TO SERVE YOU, Ih,t Smell IEneveh 1re Cere of Ourlmt IRd. & Liberty St., Covington, VA" SeePat T Ac:rdms Off F64, iExlt 4 1 703-962-8300 VAOL [ I Professional Footballers Head To Ski Slopes Skiers will have the rare op- portunity to ski with the pros this winter in West Virginia. Ftx~tball pros, that is. Silver Creek Resort has put together a benefit ski challenge ill supIxwI of the Alllerican Lung Associatio|| of West Virginia fea luring all tinle greats like Oliver Luck, former ttouston Oilers (t/mrterback. Mr l.uck, who is (-]lairinK the event, is widely known ihrtmghout West Virginia as a fi)rmer West Virginia Uni- vcrsily chamt)iouship winning (t I ta l-| erba ck. l'he challenge, in tile form of a nlodilied gialit slalom course, will be held I"ebruary 9. Each ieaill will make Iwo rims. The NASTAR handicap system will be used, and It|( AI,A~,W will be awardin prizes. A le}lll! consists of six per- sons, olle [eHlale, four tnales and a National F'ootball Ix'ague celeb- liiy tca|ll caplahl. NFL partici- pards wilt be announced after the foolball season, according to Mr Llu'k, "I am looking forward to showcasing tile uuique beauty of our slate to Illy fl'iends ill tile NFI.," said 1.uck. "as well as ln- lrod||ciilg many of them to skiing in West Virginia. Addition- ally, we hope that the event will be a boon to West Virginia's ski illdtlst l~. "On a personal nole I am en- couraged IBr West Virginia by lids proKressive endeavor by Sil- ver Creek Resort and am pleased to be working with tile American Lung Association, a header in health pronlolion ill onr state." The cost to enter tile race is $500 pet" team. The fee includes race R'es, lilt tickets for the full day, droner and party Saturday evening. A portion of the pro- ceeds will go to the American l.url~ AssocialJon of West Vir- Itinia to support lung health educational materials and lung disease prevention programs. Students Learn Flag Decorum Fil/h-grade students through- out West Virginia will learn the proper care and treatment of the United Stales flag November 9 as nlenlbers of three veterans" groups visit schools. Veterans will conduct 30-min- ute instructional sessions. Each student will receive a booklet ex- plaining flag c;.u'e and a partici- pation card from Governor Gas- 1Oil Caperlo/i, The program is designed to help studenls learn the hislory of the flag, the provisions of lhe Federal Flag Code, proper ac- /ions during the Pledge of Alle- giance and the National Anthem, and an increased respect for the flag, according to directives l'ronl the Weal Virgi||ia Division of Vet- erans" Allairs. Participating in the fifth-grade sessions will be members of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Cv'FW), the l)isabled Ainerican Veterans (DAV), and tile American Legion. Corporations. ski clubs, or- ganizations and individuals are encouraged to sign tip early for the celebrity ski challenge, as the number of tearns will be lirn- ited, according to Steve Drum- heller, marketing director lbr Sil- ver Creek Resort. "This is a char- ily event, he adds, and we are here to have fun!" For more information and reg- istration forms contact the ALAWV state ollice at P. O. Box 3980. 415 Dickinson Street, Charleston, 25339, or call Lu Schrader at the ALAWV at 342- 6600. 'Tickets' Issued To Non-Disabled October was National Disabil- ity Employment Awareness morlth. In conjunction with this the Ronceverte Job Service and area businesses placed "parking tickets" on vehicles that were parked in spaces reserved for the disabled that did not have the proper identification. A total of 43 "tickets" were distributed. A "tickets" state that un- authorized parking in a space reserved for the disabled in pun- ishable by up to a $25 fine. It also states in order to park le- gally in a space reserved for per- sons with disabilities, a vehlcle must have the special parking permit or special license plate issued by the West Virginia De- partment of Motor Vehicles. If you have a temporary or pernm- nent disability that keeps you fi-om walMng or makes it unduly difficult to do so, you may apply lbr a special parking sticker or license plate. A permit appllca- lion may be obtained by writing tile Department of Motor Ve- hicles. Attn: Special License Clerk. 1800 Washington Street, East, Charleston, 25317 or call toll free 1-800-642-9066. Please be aware that most businesses have parking spaces reserved for the disabled. Unless you have the special permit, please do not park in these spaces. Concord College Cheerleading Class Everything you need to learn to be a good cheerleader will be taught by the Concord Cheer- leaders in their annual cheer- leading clinic Saturday, Novem- ber 10 from 8:30 to 2:30. The clinlc will include instruction in Cheers, Sidelines. Gymnastics, Dance Partner Stunts, Pyramids and Mounts. The cost for the event will be $15 -- this does not include lunch. "lee-shirts will be avail- able for $5. All ages are invited to attend and take part in this cheerlead- ing event. For more information call (304) 384-5342 or 384- 3115. Roger W. Mayhew, M. A. Private Practice- Licensed Counselor Individual, Group, Marriage and Family Hypnosis-Weight Loss, Smoking Control and Stress Management 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Evenings by Appointment 645-7641 i i i i 5 Crows-Hematite, VA A m ouncing Completion of A Private Dining Room for parties o./'30 to 90 people. A ccepting RESERVA TIONS now fi r Christmas Holiday Parties 703-559.9738 Iol erta l'atton LET'S CHAT AWHILEI Let a smile be your umbrella on a rainy, rainy day. How often have we hummed those words when we feel low? Music is the art that helps us through rough days. Propaganda has it we are in an economic depression or re- cession and propaganda will al- low it to happen If we go spread- ing that philosophy around. Why isn't it just as easy to say, "tile American people will make it!" Our forefathers did, and we will too. Not only say it, but each in dividual will use their God-given talents to work toward that goal. What is the worst thing lhat could happen in each person's predicament? Most of us would say death, but as believers in God's word, we know earthly death is inevitable as well as taxes {smile awhile). So pick yourself up! We have to do this, and move on, as long as we are ainong the living, as long as our health allows it. We can understand by now that we also have to do what we can to come out of this situation. I remember "Old Doctor Compton' saying to my mother when she was down, "Mrs Pat- ton, I can give you pills or medi- cine to calm your nerves, but only you can bring yourself back to a better way of living." Old Doctor Compton rode his horse through the hills and valleys to help mountain people -- whether they had money or not. He knew the people. Race, creed, nor color meant anything to him! His mission, his talent, was to help others. Old Doctor Compton delivered five of my six children at home. *The minute you think you need me, you call me and I'll be on my wayF His advice to my mother must have been to get up and find something to do. I can re- member her thinking back over something that worried her, She would grab the broom and out she would go to sweep the porches. Or she would say, "do you have any mending you want done? She would open the dresser drawers, find something and go ahead and do it. Good nerve medicine! I could write a book about my parents and their ways of coping in time of trouble. My mother said, when she was probably in her eighties, "Work or worry will not kill you, If It did, I would have been dead long agoF She lived to be 88. Papa lived to be 96. They reared eight children to maturity and buried three before I was born. "Right at the cute age," Mama would say. They were beginning to talk and she would repeat their little sayings. When I would hear my children say darling little things and tell her, her ad- vice was to jot them down right now or you will for Being sentimental is nmn, and go ahead will wash away forget the shortest scriptures "Jesus we prayed many times world. I know people broken hearted and Coming to my mind cent special emotional tribulations in The one is a lost man, i is a horrible murder pened close by. We them, "1 know how cause nobody theln and the ~ood Halloween -- Gaye to Greenbrier Manor fume) to visit my sister Alzheimer's patient) her 89th birthday, many more patients rained and taken care~ staff. We saw her among the crowd. were in costume. Wiseman was who had become noon wasn't too know Alzheimer's Nuna lost her Patty [Mills] and Debbie, in a car and shock for Nuna. lovely lady (with hair, and eyes). Sh~ care of her clothes. particular. She pressed after the in due time she ror and saw a Soon she started hair, cleaning her teeth, and saw a lifted her up. If someone asks vice, they really IAstening to them thoughts is the best do I know all Reading and ing of others and helped me too, for a li My roses are I. "Ib all who Prayer changes 2. qldnk of your write them down. 3. Listen as otherS to tell you about their 4. Look into the betcha your change. 5. Think of a lively tune and direct) the sunny side of 6. Keep busy! Thinking of all staff in Greenbrier these people: Helen Cole -- Tammy -- The Howard Tod McQuaid Hussein {needs to man sell) -- losing boys in Lillian Morgan-- President Bush Thanks for the Cranberry Mountain Weekend Schedule The Cranberry Mountain Visi- tor Center will be open on Satur- days and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m, throughout November. Lola Morton and Waveline Cox will be there to welcome visitors to the Monongahela National Forest, The center offers exhibits, films, and information about the area. A variety of maps are avail- able. including United States Geological Survey topographic maps. These detailed maps are useful to anyone who visits the forest, and are particularly in demand during the fail hunting season. The center is expectin~ a shipment of West partment of wildlife calendars tinue to oiler other items for sale non-profit Mid Interpretive AssO there's a nature e~ your holiday gift- find what you're Cranberry Mountain' For more the visitor center, On weekdays, J~ will be available questions at the G-" office in phone number is SATELLITE Now authorized dealer for Crosley & TV's, Camcorders & VCR's US for your service on all s Complete Satellite System installed for as $50.00 a month. Office 536-4180 Oldest in the business, for 7 Dave Fraley - 647-4528 Howard Jr. Financing Available * No Down Payment on - CHOOSE. HOME HEALTH CARE SERVICES FAIRLEA MARLINTON 645-6480 799-7171 Escape to the Expe~ence ... ExpeCt ~e OM 304 - Reduced Biking