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Newspaper Archive of
Mountain Messenger
Lewisburg, West Virginia
Lyft
September 6, 1990     Mountain Messenger
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September 6, 1990
 

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The Mountain Messenger, Thursday, September 6, 1990 7A of Farmin, Ella S. Galford that professional hard at their job. hours learning their their skills, figur- beat the odds, will and double time gmn- take a vacation is job related. It seems ready to borrow and their possessions to a If this is true are professional grew up on tile J tile basics of to which they became hone their skills agriculture short Lion from farm farm specialists, field es and other (now the odds are and try to elimi- many of these as they apply fertilizers and to tile soil take. They practice nutrition recom- Crop and pasture rotat- Conservation and sub- the governnlent to and keep the water to keep the ant- of internal and exter- -~s, give imnluniza- that cause pink eye, foot root lg and other ill- place their bets on Yet in this game they are making daily bets the expen- purchases will be a that throws good that the cow won't die from some disease He is betting the calf alive and will be and stay healthy until He bets he will suf any, casualties to his deer disease, bear, odds the larmer can't control is the bets there will be amount of sunshine to produce crops he plants and that it will neither frost too late in the spring nor too early in the fall for the crops to mature. He bets there will be no crop flattening wind, stalk stripping haft, and no floods. In the past few years these odds have been more erratic than usual. For example in August we had a flash flood in the Woodrow to Campbell Town area. Laurel Creek, Pine Run, Dry Creek and Stony Creek leaped boundaries to flood land that had never been under water in our time of know- ing. Fences, bridges, roadways were demolished for some few farmers. If the devastation had been more widespread Uncle Sam would have been willing to help, but as it now stands the few affected must provide their own ante or turn their backs to the board. Even with good weather, good crops and fat sleek animals, the farmer continues to face odds. Will selling prices insure a profit? Government policies, public whims, food taint scares, beef, lamb and wool imports from countries who guarantee their farmers a base price for their products, all determine if he wins or loses. Because they are into such big gambling most can't be both- ered with penny-ante things such as lottery, horse races and card games. However if a farmer did play and win millions in a lottery or sweepstake he would most likely just continue his professional farm gambling until he had exhausted the winnings. You see he continues to believe that with hard work, continual whittling at the odds, and off- farm jobs to help support his habit, I~ady Luck will smile on him. That fickle lady does smile just often enough to keep him continually in the game. We, the Americans, are the ones who reap the rewards from this gmn- bling venture because we enjoy the best food in the world at the cheapest price. What a blessing that we have these professional farm gamblers. Recognized, State Convention of IAndside at the Future of America's (FFA) at Cedar Lakes for the American ng in agriculture increased his of Agricultural acquired sev- 1 with AC/ weld- and fin- Work. blueprint s and rafter con- and electrical engine repair and terprises include 17 beef calves, 13 brood sow, 18 of corn silage, 3 hay, 8 acres of 8 acres ol feed/ grain and 18 acres of forage crops. He has attained 15 bush- els of buckwheat/acre 37 bush- els of oats/acre, 115 bushels of corn/acre and 18 tons of corn silage/acre. Dewey was the 1989 State Proficiency Winner in the areas of Agricultural Mechanics, Diver- sified Crop Productions, and Forage Production. He was the 1988 winner in the areas of Di- versified Livestock and Feed Grain Production. Dewey is the past Southeast- ern District State FFA Vice Presi- dent. His parents are Dewey and Linda Broyles of IAndside. Dewey's agriculture teachers are Paul Lovett, Eugene Rice and Charles Larew. He is junior at West Virginia University and is majoring m Agricultural Educa- tion. I the Messenger or Luck Set Mountain International on the Farm," for Congress 9, from I Creek Farm near be $5 per per- you to a free of buffalo bur- or hot dog with POtato salad, des- Kids 12 and un- free. reek Cattle Farm, Valley at the has a animals. There pitching con- a grand prize place, $50. for the chil- a balloon ~ce, and football others. Prizes will r the winners. be a Bluegrass ~Usic through- to the Hat Creek from US 219, Valley Road, Service Sta- rstown, go two at big red barn awn chair and Proceeds will go for Congress. JIM JACKSON Insurance Division Manager MOUNTAIN INTERNATIONAL- 536-200C TRUCK USERS, FOREsTERS, AND FARMERS You are our NUMBER ONE customers! We have expanded our business to include COMPLETE INSURANCE SERVICES through our new INSURANCE DIVISION!! We cover all Commercial Lines including VEHICLES, PROPERTY, GENERAL LIABILITY, AND EQUIPMENT INLAND MARINE We can even offer Group Health & Life Packages for you and your employees. Call Jim Jackson for a competitive quote LEWISBURG 1-64 & Exit175 (304)536-2000 Steve Clausen, (left) Greg Curry, Harry Perkins, Gus Douglas, Deloris Cook, J. D. Brackenrich, John Perdue, Gaston Caperton, Jim Rowe, Bill Wallace, Mary Pearl Compton. Gov. Turkey Trot With BUTA Officials A meeting attended by Gover- nor Caperton, Senator J. D. Brackenrich, Delegates Jim Rowe. Bill Wallace, Mary Pearl Compton and Deloris Cook. was conducted with ollicials of Brit- ish United Turkeys of America (B.U.T.A.), August 16 to discuss B.U.T.A.'s present operation in the Greenbrier Valley and its plans for the future. Governor Caperton, accompa- nied by ex-Cominissioner of Ag- riculture Gus Douglas and aide John Perdue was told that the company was in the final stages of completing its third phase of expansion, a $4 million project that doubled the size of its pro- duction base in West Virginia. With completion of this phase of the expansion B.U.T.A. will have-" eight company owned farms, three contract larms, a hatchery and its corporate office located in Greenbrier County. By the end of 1990 a total of 63 full time personnel and 39 part time personnel will be employed by the company. The Governor received a de2 tailed explanation of the criteria used in selecting I~wisburg and the Greenbrier Valley as the site for B.U.T.A.'s operation. Climate, good road accessability and above all, a high quality workforce were the foremost rea- sons listed by company's spokesmen. After the meeting the Gover- nor attended a picnic organ~ed in his honor, at which a 73 pound B.U.T.A. male turkey, which had been cooked tor the occassion was on display. The turkey was later given to Green- brier Manor to provide turkey dinners for the residents. State 4-H Livestock Jud Brings Prizes To The State 4-H IAvestock judg- ing contest was held recently in Morgantown. The Greenbrier County team consisted of Stacy Scott and Levi Bland of White Sulphur Springs, and Jason Hager of Lewisburg. Their coaches were volunteers Jack Tuckwiller of Lev~lgb0r~and Terri Lynn Boggess of Alderson. The coaches spent many hours teaching the 4-H'ers how to judge beef cattle, sheep, and swine. The team ranked fourth over- all. One of the team members, Stacy Scott, received a bronze medal in the Individual Awards category. If you are interested in be- coming a volunteer or a 4-H member, please contact the County Extension Service Office on Court Street in Lewisburg, or call 645- 1525. drw v v v v ~ v ~ ~ ~ ~ v ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ v ~ v v v ~ ~ v v v v v v ~ ~ ~ ~ ~j~ A Message From ,e Final Clearance on all 90 models in stock. Come get the Deals while they last. Nissan 1990 Sentra.2dr. 4 cyl., std., , oth trim, rear defogger, radial...only $6960 1990 King Cab 4X2-4 cyL, auto, with creme package, lots of aptions..., ...... ................................................................................................................. only $8960 1990 King Cab 4X4-4 cyl, s spd. air, AM/FM/cassette, rear Bumper ............ ............................................................................................................. o0ty $10,495 1990 Pathfinder-, DR. XE-W, spd., "4X4 ot the Year'. ........................... ............................................................................................................. onty $16,295 1990 Stenza 4 DR. XE-4 cyf., auto, air, AM/FM/cassette, nice family car ....... ............................................................................................................. only $12,584 Honda 1990 Civic 4DR. EX-4 cyl., auto, air, tilt, cruise, power windows & door locks and more .................................................................................. only $11,990 1990 Civic Sta. Wagon. DX-4 cy , S,pd, air, AM FM casse, e, c oth Int .......................................................................................... ............ only $10,395 1990 Accord 4DR. DX- 4 cyl, s spd, air, AM/FM/cassette, cruise, tilt ........ ............................................................................................................. only $12,876 1990 Accord 2DR. LX- 4 cyL, auto, air, power windows, cru,'se, tilt ............ .............................................................................................................. only $14,195 This is only a partial list of the savings we have waiting for you. price include all factory rebate in affect. COVINGTON Rt. 220, 1 Mile North of Covington Sales Mon.- FrL 8 e.m, to 6 p.m.; Sat. 9 e.m. to 4 p.m. DL 7581 Service Mon.- Fft, 8 e.m. to 5 p.m.; Allen Harrltmn Sst. 8 ll.m. tO 4 p.m. ~~----~-"! co.tabu,, s.m.tt 962-7853 Grovo~ Ford Coll Morgan Barry Mullln| Bluegrass Market Saturday September 1, 1990 416 head sold to 91 buyers Amounting to $119,833.86 Alderson Market Friday August 31, 1990 2,18 head sold to 27 buyers Alnounting to $61,592.29 STOCKER & FEEDER STEERS: Under 500# 69.00 104.00 500 --- 750# 62.00 92.50 HEIFERS: Under 500# 60.00 88.50 501 -- 750# 61.00 78.50 Over 750# 46.50 72.00 BULL CALVF.,S 75.50 107.00 BABY CALVES 47.50 135.00 STOCKER & FEEDER HEIFERS: CHOICE 70.00 82.50 GOOD 65.00 77.50 MEDIUM 58.00 74.50 STOCKER & FEEDER STEERS: CHOICE 70.00 I01.00 GOOD 71.00 94.00 MEDIUM 69.00 79.00 SLAUGHTER CATTLE COWS 42.00 52.50 BULLS 58.50 64.50 OVER I000# 58.50 64.50 COW & CALF PAIRS 530.00 HOGS SLAUGHTER 45.00 55.00 SOWS 38.50 41.50 BOARS 28. O0 28.50 PIGS & SHOATS By Head 13.00 75.00 PONIES 120.00 HORSES 200.00 MULE 275.00 550.00 STOCKER & FEEDER BULLS 62.00 96.00 BABY CALVES 75.00 HOGS No. I 40.50 51.50 SOWS 43.00 COWS COMMERCIAL 50.00 53.00 UTILITY 44.00 ,19.00 BULLS COMMERCIAL & GOOD 48.00 50.00 UTILITY 45.00 53.00 CUTTER 43.00 44.00 COWS 7 CLVS: 595.00 620.00 BULLS: COMMERCIAL & GOOD 55.00 64.00 SHEEP & LAMBS SHEEP & LAMBS BLUE 41.00 BLUE 47.00 BLUE HEAD 40.50 RED 40.75 RED 38.00 OTHERS 40.00 46.00 MEDIUM 4,1.00 EWES 14.00 17.50 COMMON 43.00 EWES, CSW 11.50 16.00 GOATS GOATS By Head 9.00 30.00 Goats 16.00 33.00 Due To The Success Of Our New Car Sales We Are Currently Over Stocked With CLEAN LATE MODEL TRADE-INS ! 1990 SUBARU LEGACY L S/W 4X4-auto, air, cass,low miles..$11,900 1989 SUBARU XT COUPE 4X4 GL 5-spd,1 owner ................... $10,400 1988 SUBARU GL-IO S/W 4X4- turbo, sun roof, loaded ............. $8,995 1988 SUBARU GL S/W 4X4- 5-spd, air, cruise ............................ $6,495 1986 NISSAN SENTRA S/W- auto, air, am/fm ............................. $4100 1985 SUBARU GL S/W- 5-spd, air, am/fm ................................... $3395 1985 DODGE ARIES K-4-door,auto, air, low miles, 1owner ..... :_$3750 1984 FORD LTD S/W- V-6, auto, air ............................................ $2995 1983 MERCURY COUGAR- V-8, auto, air ................................... $3495 1982 AMC EAGLE S/W 4X4- 6-cyl, auto, air ................................ $1995 TRUCKS 1988 GMCl/2 TON 4X4-extended cab V-8, auto, air,'low miles.S13,500 1988 GMC1/2 TON 4X4- V-8, auto, long wheel base .................. $7,995 1986 FORD BRONCO il XLT 4X4- V-6, auto, air, low miles ....... $8495 1985 CHEVY S-10 BLAZER 4X4- V-6, auto, air, Tahoe Pack ..... $4995 1985 JEEP CJ7 4X4- 6-cyl, 4-spd ................................................ $4995 1985 CHEVY K-5 BLAZER 4X4- Silverado, V-8, auto, air ........... $9659 THE BEST KEPT SECRET IN TOWN Are you aware that UNITED NATIONAL: MOUNTAIN HOME PROPERTIES has a list of buyers seeking property in this area? These buyers come from every state and are ready to invest in a farm, county home, residential, or commercial prop- erty, UNITED NATIONAL can assist these investors because we are able to match buyers with sellers, satisfying the needs of both. Selling property today demands know-how. When you put your property on the market, you should demand professionalism, as buyers expect it, too. This is where UNITED NATIONAL: MOUNTAIN HOME PROPERTIES can help...by offering the best-kept secret in town to you, Don't tell anyone, and give us a call today for a confidential appointment so we can show you how our marketing plan will get results for you. WE NEED ACREAGES IN POCAHONTAS, GREENBRIER, MONROE, AND SUMMERS COUNTIES--NOW! MOUNTAIN HOME PROPERTIES Dave Cedarleaf: Broker 108 S. Jefferson St. Lewisburg, WV 24901 645-4110 ANYTIM E Sales Associates: Marianne Cedarlea1-645-4110 Kay Gumm - 392-6263 THE ONLY WAY WE CAN TELL 1000'S OF BUYERS ABOUT YOUR PROPERTY IS IF YOU LIST WITH UNITED NATIONAL: MOUNTAIN HOME PROPERTIES "America's Rural and Small Town Real Estate Company. =