"
Newspaper Archive of
Mountain Messenger
Lewisburg, West Virginia
Lyft
May 31, 1990     Mountain Messenger
PAGE 15     (15 of 24 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 15     (15 of 24 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
May 31, 1990
 

Newspaper Archive of Mountain Messenger produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




! in Priscilla Maren Tools For Toddlers ~en the ages of 3 and 4 children try hard to imi- parents and other grown- toy manufacturers make )lastic tools for children, but really work. I think it is to buy real tools for so that they can satisfaction of doing real not get a whole set of at once, but rather start with )1 at a time and teach the to use that tool before get- hammer is a good with. With just a little an adult, a 3- or 4-year-old learn to use a hammer and make simple things out of as a toy airplane, a toy spools for wheels, a row pegs to hang a Set of "jingle sticks" to with. would like to receive de- of these and other simple projects in detail, send a stamped self-ad- envelops to: Priscilla RD 1, Box 359, Hopewell, 08525. g To Make a jingle stick, you'll Stick of wood about 4 to 6 long and about 1/2 to 3/4 (square molding is good, stick from a tree will 0r 3 bottle caps, a large nail inches long), a smaller nail 2 inches) and a hammer. You take the hammer and in the center of each using the large nail. Then have your child string the bottle caps onto the smaller nail. The should fit loosely. With the bottle cap on the nail, help the child place the point of the nail near one end of the stick of wood. Hold the nail steady and give it one or two strong taps so that it will stand by itself. The hold the wood steady and let your child hammer the nail down un- til it's no longer wobbly. About an inch should remain sticking up so that the bottle caps can jiggle around. Now your child can shake the jingle stick and listen to the sound it makes. It is a good accompaniment to dancing and singing. If you make another one, the child can hold one in each hand and can tap them to- gether as well as shake them. ale! Something To Do Here's how to prepare a banana so that you and your child can each eat half of it in a way that is fun. Directions for preparing a "neat ba- nana." Cut the banana in haft, the short way. Pick up one of the halves and, starting at the cut end, gently pinch each flat -~.ction of skin so that the skin separates from the banana. Continue pinching each section of skin all the way down to the tip to loosen the skin all around. When the skin has been loos- ened, squeeze the skin just above the tip, and the banana will slide up out of its skin a little, just enough for you to take a bite. Take a bite and then squeeze the end a little more to make the banana slide up a little higher. Take another bite, and con- tinue until you've eaten it all up. No sticky fingers and no messy peel flaps! River Monitored Izaak Walton League lZaak Walton League of veying a stream's aquatic life, and U.S. 219 SOUTH AT FAIRLEA (IWLA) is expanding its network of citizen- rivers this spring with a Upcoming training work- Virginia Save Our (SOS) program teaches identify pollution prob- water quality by sur- County Commit- Inc held its annual Festival May 11 at the Building Festival consisted of such as a Country Sale, Crafts, a Dog ntests, Pie Auction, Cake Guess and Guess of the hat Contest Hat -- Elizabeth Unusual Hat -- and Funniest Hat -- The Ugly Tie Contest I bY Beaufort Taylor. The Contest was won Kenney and Bessie Calling Contest was Kenney. Door Prizes by: Dora Coleman, Cath- Dolly Kincaid, John Knapp, Sylvia Newman, Gurnie Mable Carter. The Bean Won by Agnes Haynes. guessed correctly n the Guess Cake, it was Off. lilliams, Vivian Lusher, s, Giggs Thornton, and Rhondalene In charge of the Coun- DeLong and Etuned We~'e in charge of the e and Zelma Osborne, of the Rupert Homemak- Betty Dunbar, mem- Homemakers, Crafts. John McMit- for the Pie Auc- Show was held by Mar- of Union. Her assis- Mr and Mrs Herman Entertainment by Reverend Sterling Backus and Mildred Eluned Dewberry at and everyone who May Day Festival are Thanks to the GFWC Ln's Club for sponsor- the Community Build- Day Festival. thanks to all the organizations who Tabor Towers, n, Bonanza, Corner- an Bookstore, Mountain re Coal House, Bank of FPrings, Alvin's Pro- lowers, Bowling's Auto of White ~s, Gillespie Flowers, bose Gift Shoppe, and Rupert Flo- take action to protect a stream from pollution. Started in the panhandle in fall 1989, SOS is planning to ex- pand rapidly this spring to include hundreds of volunteer stream moni- tors. The program is being conducted in cooperation with the West Virginia Department of Natural Resources (DNR). According to DNR Director Edward Hamrick, "1 feel this project will prove beneficial to our (West Virginia's) water quality protection efforts." Data gathered by volunteers is compiled on the League's computer and will be used by the DNR to gain a broader and more accurate per- spective of the quality of West Virginia's rivers. According to SOS Coordinator Karen Firehock, "Cur- rently the state monitors only 30 per- manent stations on its 28,000 miles of rivers. Officials need data sup- plied by volunteers to accurately as- sess and protect West Virginia's riv- ers." Workshops will be held from 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday, June 12 at the State 4-H Conference Center in Weston, West Virginia. Workshops are open to all inter- ested citizens and are free of charge. Attendees at the wo.rkshop will learn river restoration and moni- toring techniques through presenta- tions and hands-on training and will then register to adopt a stream of their choice to monitor and protect. Interested citizens should contact ei- ther SOS Coordinator Koran Fire- hock, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (703)528-1818 or Paul Brant of the League's West Vir- ginia Division at (304)574-3036 to register. Save Our Streams is a na- tional stream protection program es- tablished by League Maryland chap- ters in 1969; and expanded nation- wide by the League's national office. SOS is currently operating in over 35 states. The West Virginia SOS project is run by the League's na- tional office in Arlington, Virginia and is funded primarily by the Virginia Environmental Endowment. Formed in 1922, the Izaak Wal- ton League of America is a national nonprofit conservation organization, whose 50,000 members are dedi- cated to protecting and restoring America's precious natural re- sources. The League has 1,091 members in 13 chapters in West Vir- ginia. Veterans Poppies The Veterans of Foreign Wars and its Ladies Auxiliary of #4484 will hold their annual Buddy Poppy Sale Saturday June 2. Did you know that hospitalized veterans are the ones who make these poppies? The VA Hospital in Martinsburg is one of these hospitals that does this. The money goes to help needy veterans Greenbrier County The Mountain Messenger Thursday, May 31, 1990 15A 4-H Presentation Trish Crane (left) & Jennifer McClintic Tdsn Crane (left), Lisa Morgan, Steve Tennent, & Clay Helmick The Friends of the Alderson Li- brary invite all clubs, organizations or businesses in the Alderson area to participate in the '~Bridge Festival" planned for June 16 from 10 a.m. to 4p.m. Each club, organization, or busi- ness can set up a fundraising booth on the old bridge for the price of $10. Proceeds will be evenly divided between the Renaissance Commit- tee and The Friends of the Alderson Public Library. Money from the booths will go to the individual clubs nr organizations. Booths may sell cra;t~. ;n~d, drinks, or other prod- ucts in keeping with a festival-type atmosphere. Plans for booths so'far include selling T-shirts; note pads; signed prints; a carnival game booth; novel- ties; and grilled hotdogs. No "yard sale stuff" allowed. In conjunction with the "Bridge Festival" the Alder- son Renaissance committee plans a flea market on the Monroe side of the bridge. Use this opportunity to raise funds for your organization while helping the Alderson Renaissance Committee and the Alderson Li- brary. For more information or to register a booth, phone 445-722!. The Greenhr:,er County 4-H Vis- e31 Prosentation, Public Speaking and Creed Contest was held at Greenbrier East High School with approximately 25 participants. Win- ner of the Creed Contest was Clay Helmick of Clintonville. The Creed may be recited by any 4-H member 12 years of age and under. The par- ticipants were judged on voice pro- jection, fluency, punctuation, articu- lation and voice control. The Public Speaking Contest was won by Jennifer McClintic of Williamsburg (Junior Division) and Jenny Sizemore of Trout (Senior Di- vision). Their speeches, "President John F. Kennedy" and "Remember- ing Education," respectively, were judged on thecontestant's appear- ance, delivery, and the composition of the speech. There were several winners in the Visual Presentations Contest. In the category of computers, Crystal Lake of Williamsburg won first place with her presentation "Computer History." "Pigs" was the title of the winning visual in the Livestock Cate- gory given by Chris Judy of Wil- liamsburg. Another Williamsburg winner was J. R. Hedrick with his presentation entitled "Electric Weld- ing." Stewart Lewis, also of HI- liamsburg, won with his presenta- tion, "Chilkats Indians." Willy Stidom of the Williamsburg Black Bear 4-H Club won first place in the Petroleum Power category. His presentation was on "Small En- gines." Misty Shortridge won first place with "How to Make a Bunny Basket" in the Clothing Construction Techniques category. Misty is from Clintonville. From the Edgewood Up & Com- ers II 4-H Club, Gayle Napier won first place with her presentation, Retired Teachers To Meet June 1 The Greenbrier Association of Retired School Employees will meet Friday June 1, 10:30 a.m., at the Lewisburg Methodist Church Guest speaker will be Dorothy Babbitt, Director of the Association's Region Five. AI Meadows will again make whistles for the group. A demonstra- tion of "whistle blowing" will be led by Irma Powell. A report will be given by the Leg- islative Committee composed of Chades Boothe, Ruth Armstrong, AI Meadows, Dr John Montgomery, Roy Coffman, Nelson Dailey, Mar- garet Irvine and James Sampson. This Committee met to formulate a program to be presented to the State Legislative Committee. Committee Assignment for 1990- 91 will be read to the group. The meeting will adjourn by noon. Every retiree is urged to attend. P. O. Complaints To Be Heard Have you ever wished for some- one to listen to your postal prob- lems? The White Sulphur Springs Post Office lobby is the place to go with these concerns Thursday, June 7 from 8:30 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. at a "Coffee and Comments" session being conducted by the Consumer Affairs Representative of the Char- leston Division of the Postal Service. An exchange of comments and information will be held and coffee will be served. "This session Js one of the first of many which will be held at various post offices in an at- tempt to assist customers with their postal concerns and to ncrease understanding between the custom- ers and their local post offices," ac- cording to Carol Dunnavant, Com- municatons Manager for the Char- leston area Postal Service offices. Will Sell June "April Showers Bring May Flowers." Aaron Helmick of Clintonville is tak- ing a project on dairy cattle and won first place in the Dairy category with "Dairy Cattle." Selena Kessinger, also of Clintonvitle, won first place with her presentation "Sugar Maple" in the forestry category. Other participants in the contest were: Mercedes Clements of the Coffman Hill Sodbusters 4-H Club, Mikael Jones and Michelle Massie of the Clintonville Towerlights 4-H Club, Angela Gains, Dora Lyons, Floyd Lester, Angel Quinn, Leann Hedrick, Jamie Reed, Lisa Gladwell, Jennifer Lester, Amy Judy and Adam Haynes all of the Wil- liamsburg Black Bears 4-H Club. Judges for the event were: Tammy Crane, Lisa Morgan, and Dabble Montgomery of Lewisburg, Detra McVey and Barry Kaizer of Alderson, Tom Tuckwiller of Clinton- ville, Barbara Smallwood of White Sulphur Springs, Troy Forren of Fort Spring, Loretta Moore of Rupert, and Steve Tennant of Ronceverte. 4-H members and adult volun- teers who assisted with the contest were: Janet Johnson and Ollie Hoover of Rainelle, Bruce and Jeane Brenneman of Rupert, Tony Sartor and Lisa Richardson of Le- wisburg, Luther Hanson of Asbury, lan Mcllvaine of Meadow Bluff, Cindy Tuckwiller of Clintonville and Monica Holliday of Smoot. M 'k"TY,L. M ON FULL-SIZE 2 WD & 4 WD PICKUPS (Regular Cab) M mln~ M M w~ and their families. Some of the money goes to help the children at the national Home in Eaton Rapids, ~"" Michigan, The Scholarship Fund; upkeep of the West Virginia Cot- "" tage, gifts for the children, educa- tion. So when you see one of VFW members Post or Auxiliary selling these poppies, stop and buy one. What? You're Not A Bus Drived Suzie's team is on its way to the state championship finals, if only they could get a ride. Unfortunately, the whole team will not fit in your car, and you don't have a spare bus stot l in your garage. Come on down to U-Save Auto Rental and select one of our dependable and economical vehicles. We can't guarantee the team will win the title, but we'll bet we can get them to the game in comfort and on time! Your Home Town Car.Rental Company ION DAKOTAS, FULL-SIZE |-DmSEL TRUCKS I CLUB CAB PICKUPS JC O A CLUB CAB ON SPIRIT/ACCLAIM SUNDANCE/SHADOV DAYTONA ES LASER ON IMPERIAL, LEBARON COUPE, DYNASTY, MONACO LE, NEW YORKER SALON, NEW YORKER LANDAU, LEBARON SEDAN CHRYSLER LEASE CARS 1990 Dodge Shadow-4dr., auto, air ............................................................... $10,495 1990 Dodge Spirit-auto, air, power window & door locks, low miles .............. $11,495 1990 DOdge Caravan SE-7 pass. V6, auto, cruise, tilt ................................. $15,495 1990 Dodge Dynasty LE-air, auto, cruise, tilt, low miles ............................... $13,995 1989 Plymouth Horizon-auto, air, low miles ..................................................... $'3'995 1989 Chrysler New Yorker-low miles, air, cruise, extra sharp ...................... $15,495 7/70 Power Train Warranty available. Financing as low as 9.5% available to qualified buyers. 1989 1989 1989 1988 1988 1987 1987 1986 1986 1986 1986 1985 1984 1984 PLYMOUTH ACCLAIM -AUTO,. AIR. LOW MILES ......................................................... $ I0,995. BUlCK REGAL-auto,. cruise. PW & Door ocks. alr ...................................................... $11,995. FORD ESCORT GT - low miles, air ........................................................... $8995. OLDS 98-cruise, mr, auto., PW & PD .............................................................................. $11,995. OLDS DELTA 88 - A/C, cruise, tilt, power windows & locks, sharp ............................. $9895, DODGE LANCERautornatic, AC,AM/FM cassette, low mileage ................................ $6~J~5, CHEVY CAVALIER STATION WAGON- auto,, air .................................... $5495. FORD MUSTANG- 4 Speed ........................................................................................... $4295. HONDA ACCORD LX - automatic, low mileage .................................................... $8495. FORD TAURUS GL- 4 door, auto., air. AM/FM cassette, extra nice .................... $7495. CHRYSLER NEW YORKER - front wheel drive, low miles, extra sharp ..................... $8995. DODGE ARIES-auto.. air .......................................................................................... $3495. DODGE 600-auto.. air. AM/FM stereo .............................................................................. $3495. PONTIAC GRAND PRIX- 6, auto., air ....................................................... $4995. 1983 PLYMOUTH RELIANT- low mileage, auto., exc. cond ................................................. $3495, 1979 CHEVY MONTE CARLO - t-too, auto., A/C, extra sharp .............................. $2995. 1974 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE -. ...................................................................... $2495 1990 1989 1989 1987 1987 1986 1986 1985 1984 1983 DODGE DAKOTA-8 ft. bed. 2WO. auto. low miles ................................................ $11,995 JEEP CHEROKEE - 4 WD. V6. AUTO.. AIR ................................................................... $16,995, DODGE DAKOTA- SPORT PKG., AM/FM CASS., alr, auto, 4x4. low miles .............. $13,995. DODGE W 150- 4 WD. long wheel base. auto., air. LE Package ...................... $11,995. DODGE RAIDER-4 WD, 5 spd., air, Air ...................................................... $8495. JEEP COMMANCHE - 4x4 ................................................................................ $8495. FORD RANGER - super cab, 4 WD, LXT ....................................................... $8495, JEEP CHEROKEE CHIEF-4 WD. air ............................................................ $6995, DODGE D350 - dual wheel, 2 WD .............................................................. $5995. DODGE RAMCHARGER - 4 WD auto., air. Snowplow ............................................. $4995