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Newspaper Archive of
Mountain Messenger
Lewisburg, West Virginia
Lyft
March 27, 1990     Mountain Messenger
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March 27, 1990
 

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JOB The Mountain Messenger, Tuesday, March 27, 1990 Mr Evans Will Teach Batik English born artist Jonathan S. Evans, will teach a course in Batik ~ainting at Carnegie Hall in Lewis- b~urg. Batik is an ancient wax-resist process for dyeing cloth. Wax and dyes are alternatively applied to cot- t6n to create brilliantly colored batik ~intings. A graduate of Edinburgh Univer- sity with an MA in Fine Arts. Mr Evans has worked 20 years profes- sionally as a Batik artist and has ~aught courses in this art form for many years. He moved to the United States in 1978 and has made his home in West Virginia since t985. His work has been exhibited world wide, most notably in Spain, Ger- many, New York, California and re- cently at the Textile Museum in Washington, D. C. In 1984, his work was chosen to represent the United States in the International Batik Ex- hibition in Cologne, Germany. The course begins April 3 and r-~ t.,, The Messenger ....... PI.OPLI. I ~'~" V li L , s,. ,.o wii! meet for 8 sessions between 6:30 and 8:30 Am.. Tuition is $60 and a Lab fee of $40 wi.II be charged. Registration and tuition is due prior to March 27: Call 645- 7917 for registration. Williamsburg Historic Meeting An organizational meetingof the Williamsburg Historic Foundation Committee will be held Sunday, April 1 at 6 p.m., at Williamsburg School. Anyone interested is urged to attend. Reproductions of historic photo- graphs are now being made. If you have any photos of family or build- ings associated with the Wil- liamsburg District, please send them to: Wayne Jackson, Williamsburg 24991. Pictures will be reproduced for the Foundation's use and all originals will be returned to the sender. Any other material of his- toric interest --- wills, letters, other printed materials or souvenirs -- are welcomed for Foundation records and an also be returned after copy- ing, Big Discounts on Straight Sales Great Allowances On Trade-Ins 3 month 100% Limited Warranty Only at 1978 Mustang King Cobra ......................................... 4495.00 V8,302 ........................................................ Discount 500.00 $3995.00 1981 Buick Skylark ..................................................... 1995.00 auto, air ........................................................ Discount 400.00 $1595.00 1983 Buick Regal Limited ......................................... 4395.00 loaded one owner ....................................... Discount 500.00 $3895.00 1984 Cutlass Supreme ............................................... 4295.00 V6, air, auto, PW .......................................... Discount 500.00 $3795.00 1985 Thunderbird Elan ............................................. 699 .00 V6, every option ........................................... Discount1000.00 $5995.00 1986 Buick Century Limited ..................................... 6995.00 every option ................................................ Discount 600.00 $6395.00 1987 Olds Calais ......................................................... 7495.00 V6, loaded, one owner ................................. Discount 1000.00 .... $6495.00 1987 Ford Taraus ......................................................... 7495.00 loaded ........................................................... Discount 900.00 $6595.00 1988 Ford Tempo .......................................................... 7495.00 auto, like new ............................................... Discount 800.00 $6695.00 1989 Subaru GL ............................................................ 8495.00 4 dr,, auto, air .............................................. Discount 800.00 $7695.00 1988 Mustang LX .......................................................... 8995.00 4 cyl., fuel injected, cabernet red beauty ..... Discount 1000.00 $7995.00 1988 Celebrity 4 DR ....................................................... 7995.00 4 cyl, fuel injected, auto air, cruise, tilt .......... Discount 1000.00 $6995.00 1988 ESCOrt GT ............................................................. 7495.00 4 cyl., fuel injected, 5 sAd., air, cruise, tilt ..... Discount 800.00 $6295.00 1987 Mercury Topaz LS .............................................. 6995.00 has all options .............................................. Discount 1000.00 $5995.00 1976 Chev. S cottsdale w/camper .............................. 1995.00 ....................................................................~ Discount 400.00 $1595.00 1985 Dodge Caravan SE ............................................. 6495.00 auto, air ....... .............................................. Discounh 800.00 $5695.00 4X4 1984 Chev. Scottsdale ............................................... :. 7495.00 v8, air, loaded and sharp .............................. Discount 500.00 $6995.00 1985 Chev. Scottsdale Show Truck ......................... 8495.00 V8. loaded, like new ...................................... Discount 700.00 $7795.00 1985 Chev. S-10 Blazer ................................................ 8495.00 v6, 5 sAd, air ................................................. Discount 500.00 $7995.00 1986 Ford F150 Kit ........................................................ 8995.00 VS. fuel injected, air, sharp ........................... Discount 1000.00 $7995,00 1986 Nissan King Cab .................................................. 7995.00 5 sad., air, cass, one owner ............................ Discount 600.00 $7395.00 1987 Chev. S-10 Blazer Tahoe Pkg ........................ 11,995.00 red & white, loaded ..................................... Discount 1000.00 $10,995.00 1987 Bronco il Eddie Bauer ....................................... 8495.00 loaded, high miles ........................................ Discount 1000.00 $7495.00 1987 Ford Ranger .......................................................... 6995.00 V6, fuel injected, 5 sad, new tires ................... Discount 800.00 $6195.00 1988 Dodge Ram 50 .................................................. $7995.00 All advertised discounts on Straight Sales Only Easy Access off 1-64 first Covington Exit Covington, Virginia ,,,, coo. 1.783-962,8300 ea Rescue By Jonathan Wright The Greenbrier County Emer- gency Ambulance Service in Fairlea is initiating a "subscription plan" by which participants will not be billed for any of the service's fees not cov- ered by insurance. "This will benefit our community, because Medicare and Medicaid have made it rough on people by cutting back on what they pay," Reatha Bryant said. Ms Bryant is the group's vice president. Besides paying claims made through the program, proceeds will be used primarily to upgrade rescue equipment and to purchase a new ambulance. Operating funds for the ambulance service come mainly through insurance payments, Ms Bryant said. The Greenbrier County Commission provides insurance coverage on the squad's vehicles. Residents in the service area will received information in the mail in the next few weeks explaining the "subscription plan." Charges are $20 for each individual, or a maximum of $50 for a family. The plan will cover individuals only for emergencies in which the patient is transported to Humana Hospital/Greenbrier Valley or AI- leghany Regional Hospital. The plan is also good for individuals and fami- lies without insurance, paying the full bill for services. "We hope everyone takes the time to read our information," Ms Bryant said. "If they do, I know they will realize they will be saving money by subscribing." The Fairlea-based group serves an area bounded on the north by Clendenenville, the east by the Caldwell Pentecostal Holiness Church, the south by the Greenbrier County line on U,. S. 219 at Second Creek, and the West by Burdette's Restaurant near Fort Spring. Ap- proximately 6,500 households are included in the area, accordi'ng to Ms Bryant. The group hopes to raise $20,000 from the subscription plan in its first year. Similar fund-raising programs ar6 used by other rescue/ ambulance services, she said. Garden Clinic To Be March 30 Greenbrier County West Virginia University (WVU) Extension Home- makers are "calling all gardeners!!" Circle Friday, March 30 on your cal- endars and plan to spend the morn- ing learning all the latest techniques involved in the cultivation of many new and unusual varieties of house- plants and flowers,"Andrea Gainer, WVU Extension Agent, said. Dr Richard K. Zimmerman, WVU Cooperative Extension Specialist of Horticulture and Plant Science, "will be on hand to present a most infor- mative workshop on everything you ever wanted to know about garden- ing, but were afraid to ask," Mrs Gainer said. The workshop will get underway at 10 a.m. at the Renick Firehouse with the Hostess Clubs of Renick, Frankford, Town and Country pro- viding a morning snack with coffee and a luncheon of salads and des- erts --"larger appetites are encour- aged to pack a sandwich," Mrs Gainer stated. Coordinators are Martha Work- man and Nancy Hayes. Babysitting will be available. Greenbrier Artists' Greenbrler Artists will hold their sixth annual art show at Greenbrler Community College, Lewisburg. The public is invited to attend an open house Sunday April 1, from 1 to 5 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Paintings exhibited have been chosen as the best works of the year for each artist, some of which will be offered for sale. The exhibit will remain at Greenbrier Community College until April 5,/and then will be taken to Dabney Lancaster College, Clifton Forge. Shown here are: (back row) Jenevle Newman, Betty McClung, Betty Carter, Lillian Judy, Carol Mankins, Angle Fullerton, Lauri Jones, Marge Epperley, Shelby Bryant, Judy Lilly, Boo Falk, Vivian Coffman. (front row) Virginia McClung, Margle Sweet, Ann Hayes, Judy Rider, Jeanne Brenneman, Barbara Daniel. After nearly five years, the nation's first non-profit telecommuni- cations information service contin- ues to help West Virginia consumers make informed choices about their phone service, according to Sylvia Rosenthal, executive director of the Tele-Consumer Hotline. The Tele-Consumer Hotline can be reached toll-free on 1-800-332- 1124. It offers free information and advice on choosing phone service. Hotline counselors are prepared to answer questions on selecting a long distance company, determining what is wrong with a phone and choosing between telephone equip- ment rental and purchase. They can also help consumers with vision, motion, speech or hearing impair- ments. The Hotline was organized in 1984 by the Consumer Federation of America and the Telecommunica- tions Research and Action Center to answer questions the local phone companies were prohibited from an- swering. "The Hotline is the result of a col- laboration that was designed to meet a unique information need," Ms Rosenthal said. "Many consum- ers suddenly needed help with the selection of a service which previ- ously offered no alternatives." Learn what it takes to fill your heart with hope, Join us for the meetings below. Hde.o Attend The Church Nearest You: First Baptist, Fairlea .................................................. ......... April 8-11 White Sulphur Springs Baptist ......................................... April 8-15 Trinity Baptist, Buckeye .................................................... April 8-15 Chairty Baptist, Edray .............................. . ........ : ............... April 8-15 First Baptist, Huntersville ............................................... April 22-28 Helen Woodward The final stage of dis-ease is re- construction. Our body, our entire system, has been through a rough time. We must now rebuild our strength. Remember the adage, "Rome wasn't built in a day." Recon- structing weekened systems does take time. This phase should begin simply with simple, easy to digest fluids and foods before adding the more complex and heavy ones, if ever. Go slow, pushing the natural course of the feelings of our body only crates loss of energy. We can easily go right back to where we were only to start all over. Good nutrients for building ther- apy are bee pollen, goto kola, gin- seng and spirulina -- along with specific tonics needed to treat the individual and/or various stressed organs. Ginseng, pana~ schin-seng -- Chinese ginseng, or panax quinque- folium -- American ginseng (Ararli- aceae), is native to China and East Asia, primarily Manchuria and Ko- rea, and North America where it can be found in the rich, cool shady slopes and ravines of a hardwood forest. Ginseng cultivation is becom- ing more popular and profitable as the plant can be cultivated from ei- ther a cracked or partially germi- nated seed, yet being a very shy plant, "seng must be protected from the strong rays of the sun. The usual process is to create different shade houses and canopies for the various growth stages. Five to seven years is recommended for a good root. For this reason it is ex- tremely important to keep ginseng off the endangered species list by always leaving some seed behind to insure the continuous propagation of the plant. In 1971, a "catty" (21.33 oz.) of Chinese White Imperial Gin- seng sold for $5,000. Lesser grades, Korean and Chinese red, Korean white, American wild sold from $100 to $220 tops, ending with the last listed grade, Japanese and American cultivated, for $36.60 a catty. -Making a profit on herbs is defi- nitely growing in popularity but if the plant becomes extinct, even in a certain area or region by ignoring the laws of nature -- plants do grow from seeds -- there will be no profit for there will be no plants. Never take the last one -- bloom, plant, or seed from any plant species found in the wild for you could be truly the last 'laker." Although ginseng has gone through periods of history vacillating between belief and herb does have a cent, nervine, stimulant stomachic influences on At present ginseng, monly as American, Chinese ginseng, five mandrake root, panax, sang (in French "san blood), is a popular tonic especially males. The more romantic giver~ to the herb perhaps it's other qualities: flower for everlasting, root of life, man, seed of earth and the-world. The Chinese have this herb for over 5,000 blood pressure regulator~ strengthen the central tem. The Russians were to the plant through a gift of'~ from a Chinese Emperor to sian Tsar. For a long was ignored, yet even still be seen in the Saint botanical museum. out Russia, including naturalists, recommend a day (6-week) daily intake of g to everyone over forty yearS as a general tonic to be both the spring and the search taken from those ing this daily/seasonal an increase in overalt bodilY' mainly through glandular system and vigoration of blood results prove to be a more metabolism with the chain of improved blood the benefit of lowered sure. Native American cially the Algonquin, CI Chippewa, Creeks and were all active with their seng root. They also found as an aphrodisiac, nervine, stimulant and Many ills were, and hav~ cured with a good the nature of ginseng. Of testing to their devoted "gensing cure" lived, ast prove from both among Indians and the Asiatics, for 256 years! Life is a lesson in care of ourselves. Editor's Note: These intended for educational only. They are not intended diagnose or prescribe, considered as a fessional care. The West Virginia Division of Cul- ity by a panel ot ture and History will hold its semi- specialists. The jury annual jurying for crafts April 6. twice a year in April Work can be delivered on that day Acceptance provides between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m; Entries sale of crafts in. The will also be accepted at the Cultural Cultural Center and its Center "Shop" between March 23 shops, through several and April 5. gift shops, and in special West Virginia craftspeople pro-projects. ducing original works, made by Revenue generated hand or with the necessary and ap- provides continual propriate tools, are eligible. Pieces marketing program assembled from a commercially sold chase of West Vin kit are not acceptable. Prints, photo- For more information graphs, drawings and painting are ing process or for an not eligible for crafts jurying, form, contact The Shop Crafts are selected for their qual- 0690. Pipestem Appalachian culture, history, edu- cation, and community planning will be examined March 23 and 24 in a Conference on Appalachian Geog- raphy at Pipestem State Park. Or- ganized by the Concord College Appalachian Studies Program, this biennial conference is open to the public. Teachers are encouraged to attend; the counties of Mercer, Monroe, and Raleigh will award in- service credit for participation. The first session, scheduled to begin at 7:15 p.m. March 23, covers planning related topics such as the Appalachian Regional Commission, proposed landfill sites, and the New River Parkway. Scheduled for Saturday morning (March 24) are reports frown re- searchers throughout central Ap- palachia, including individuals from .Appalachian State University (North Carolina), University of Tennessee, Kent State (Ohio), University of -North Carolina--Charlotte, and Bluefield State and Concord Col- leges. a member of the Board of Direc- tors for West Virginia higher educa- tion, Dr Joseph F. Marsh, will pres- ent "An Overview of the Reorganiza- tion of Higher Education in the Mountain State." Saturday afternoon a special session on toudsm and state fairs will be presented by Marlene Pier- son, Assistant Manager of the West Virginia State Fair, assisted by guests from surrounding states. The conference will ports on Appalachian raphy. ' Social studies and teachers are particularly' to participate, said ganizer Dr. Joseph tration for the conference $10 for students. The fee, except for $2 to ments, is being waived For more information Manzo at Concord 5208. Young Medals The Governor's office nominations for two tional awards to ing conduct by women 18 years eld or The Young Amer Program recognizes who have "made butions to the life of West Virginia. Nominations bravery Or service rected to General Secretary of Public Coonskin Drive, Nominations must later than March 30.